Wednesday, May 26, 2010

May 2010 Challenge - Give me Gothic CLOSED - Winner to be announced June 3, 2010


The Challenge is now closed and a winner has been chosen via random.org.
The winning book is Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
Thank you to everyone for leaving comments!

Time for a new Challenge here at the Latherati blog! I received a convo from a reader requesting a gothic scent so what better way to find a fantastic gothic read than by offering a Challenge?

Just leave a comment with your suggestion for a gothic novel, including author. Be sure to leave your email so I can contact you if you win. I'll use a Random Number Generator to choose a winner.

The winner will receive one bar of soap inspired by the winning book, along with another bar of their choosing. Challenge ends June 2, 2010, 9pm, EST.

*** Photography courtesy of my friend, Jeffrey Montalbano. Click on any of the pics to check out his photos on Flickr :-) ***

78 comments:

  1. One gothic novel that's always stayed with me is The Devil On Horseback by Victoria Holt. I was spellbound the first time I read it many years ago!

    whistlingbonise at hotmaildotcom

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  2. I always like the classics, so Frankenstein and Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allen Poe would be my favorites. Great subject by the way.

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  3. Oooh, make something Edgar Allen Poe inspired! All of his work is classic...Annabelle Lee, The Raven...

    ellaetc@gmail.com

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  4. These may be strange suggestions, but Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Leroux's The Phantom of the Opera are particularly evocative to me. For the former, it could be a sea-inspired scent (saline, fresh, clean), and for the latter it could be something deep and rich (like red wine, currants and champagne - it would have to be red, of course).

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  5. I keep thinking about it but nothing REALLY Gothic that I've read comes to mind right now.

    I only have "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" but I don't think that's the Gothic you're looking for. LOL

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  6. I nominate the Twilight novels!

    Hello from the Forums!

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  7. I think you should do a soap inspired by Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson. Could yield some great combos! Thanks.

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  8. Vathek an Arabian Tale , 1786
    by William Beckford and it was originally a french novel now in English .

    tumblemumbo at gmail dot com

    thank you

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  9. Hi :) I'd like to suggest the first gothic novel "The castel of Otranto" by Horace Walpole (1764) and the modern Anne Rice's vampires books. I love Lovecraft and Poe... ok, I love all gothic novels and music :)
    Thank you :D
    mairi71[at]fdsoftware[dot]it

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  10. I guess Gothic is an interesting genre... would Wuthering Heights count??

    ms(dot)verymarried(at)gmail(dot)com

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  11. Hmm, does Edgar Allan Poe's Complete Works (poetry) count? If not, then Dracula. :)

    Thank you for this opportunity!

    samyrocks92 at msn dot com

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  12. The Phantom of the Opera: Gaston Leroux

    Thanks for the giveaway!

    nupur.kittur AT gmail DOT com

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  13. I would say rebecca by daphne du maurier was a classic gothic novel.
    twoofakind12@yahoo.com

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  14. I won some Latherati soap last summer, so you don't have to enter me, but I recommend Isak Dinesen's "The Monkey" from "Seven Gothic Tales". Isak Dinesen was the pen name of Karen Blixen, a Dane who lived in East Africa, and whose works are wonderful.

    If you want to see a very brief but awesome video on three women who revolutionized the Gothic novel you should watch this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-NKXNThJ610

    urchiken at gmail dot com

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  15. Get The Necronomicon by HP Lovecraft. It's a collection of all his short stories. It's freaking amazing - his stories are AWESOME - and with its gold-bound pages it looks really rockin' on the coffee table.

    lauren.m.gibson AT gmail DOT com

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  16. I'd recommend Northanger Abbey, by Jane Austen for an amusing view on the gothic novel, or Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, by John Berendt for a modern southern gothic take.

    sugareaterATgmailDOTcom

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  17. I suggest 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Bronte. It's dark, tragic and has no "happily ever after" ending.

    spamscape [at] gmail [dot] com

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  18. "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde. c:

    vesipisaroita [at] gmail [dot] com

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  19. My recommendation would be either Frankenstein by Mary Shelley or Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier.

    anja.lju at gmail dot com

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  20. Call of Ctulhu-H.P. Lovecraft or Dracula-Bram Stroker.they're classic!thanks

    violet_bohemian at windowslive dot com

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  21. I've never read one so I would guess Edger Allen Poe.

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  22. I'd have to say Frankenstein by Mary Shelley.

    Thanks for the chance to win!

    --Liza

    ejm6x (at) yahoo (dot) com

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  23. Go for Edgar Allen Poe! My dad gave me a book of his complete works years ago when I was a ditzy teenager and couldnt care less about that kind of thing. I love flipping through it now though!

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  24. I would recommend Northanger Abbey or Jane Eyre for a classic Gothic novel and The Thirteenth Tale for a newer one.

    Kristin.Brown106 AT gmail DOT com

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  25. any novel by edgar allan poe would be great
    ohhhfire@hotmail.com

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  26. gothic?...

    what about oscar wilde's dorian gray? Sublime, noir, elegant and grotesque..

    Also Dracula from Bram Stroker, books of Emily Brontë, Carmilla from J.S de Fanu and The phantasm of the opera from Gastón Leroux...

    I hope this are inspiring! :D

    Thanks for the opportunity to win!

    mail: cailinn@gmail.com

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  27. Ann Radcliffe is pretty good. "The Mysteries of Udolpho" is considered a classic.

    dhudson6279@gmail.com

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  28. half_blue_sky@yahoo.com

    For something more recent perhaps Lost Souls by Poppy Z. Brite or anything by Caitlin R. Kiernan.

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  29. All my first suggestions have been taken, Northanger Abbey, Mysteries of Udolpho, Jane Eyre. And you already have a Wuthering Heights...hmmm, okay how about

    The Masque of the Red Death, Edgar Allan Poe

    P.S I have just received your Milk Maid roll on and lip balm, they are delicious!

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  30. I know Twilight is a cliche... but everyone loves it and gets obsessed! They are so good!

    lauresilvia@yahoo.com

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  31. I suggest Edgar Allen Poe. My eighth grade English/Literature teacher, introduced the class to Poe's short stories. When the class complained that the stories were hard to understand, the teacher patiently helped us to understand and comprehend the stories. I have enjoyed Poe's stories ever since, and I appreciate Mr. Griffin our teacher.

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  32. Here's a gothic novel in the modern sense - Exquisite Corpse by Poppy Z Brite.

    nvlasky@gmail.com

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  33. Nothing better inspires gothic than Mary Shelly's Frankenstein:)
    earthdancedaph@yahoo.com
    earthdancedaph.blogspot.com

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  34. I'd be so happy to win this give away! My recommendation, We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

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  35. I love the "Phantom of the Opera" by Gaston Leroux, although I don't know if it strictly counts as a gothic novel.

    debyeo at hotmail dot com

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  36. I would recommend Ann Radcliff: Gaston de Blondeville

    queen-of-pain(AT)yandex(DOT)com

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  37. I would recommend that old gothic standby - Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

    amysweeps at gmail dot com

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  38. I suggest Poe's The Mask of the Red Death. It makes me think of the "Black Death" (Bubonic Plague) and those funny masks with the long noses. They filled those noses with Five Thieves Oil to keep from getting the plague themselves. That might be a good bases for the sent.
    lanacabral@yahoo.com

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  39. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  40. Christina - xrisyta@rock.com - Flowers Of Evil,
    the poems of Baudelaire, translated from the French!

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  41. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley would be a great one-- I doubt you have anything in an "angry villager" type scent, but I'm thinking something autumny, like dried leaves and bonfires.... amyDOTrohdeATgmailDOTcom

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  42. i'm not sure i know the definition of "gothic" but i read a novel by Ken Follett, "World Without End" which is so captivating! it's about life in the 12th century, very dark and alluring. excellent author too!
    @FlamingBlingy
    phranne[at]yahoo.com

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  43. Hi!

    Well Frankenstein is always a good option.. but what about jane eyre?

    nilaahn@gmail.com

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  44. I think the novel Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde
    by Robert Louis Stevenson is gothic and could definitely be an inspiration for you.
    oldsockfarm AT gmail D0T com

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  45. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  46. I thought that either I thought the Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman or Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier. You could do a light floral top note for Rebecca as she is more naive in the beginning and then have a more heady end note as a finish when she comes into her own.
    mistymeadow88@hotmail.com

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  47. I like Twilight novels.

    Hugs

    ale84.vercelli at hotmail dot it

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  48. Oh, I was thrilled when I saw the mechanics! I love gothic books!! Especially "The Devil On Horseback" of Victoria Holt! I know someone suggested this already but this is really the best I've read so far! :)

    bugs(dot)bittle23{AT}gmail(dot)com

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  49. I don't know if this counts as strictly gothic: Sylvia Cassedy's "Behind the Attic Wall." No one's swanning around in black lace, nor are there any vampires :). How to describe it without giving anything away? A socially estranged orphan's newest home is a former girls' school; her "normal" life is still full of pain, but she creates a little family with the pair of living china dolls she discovers in the attic. Strictly speaking, it's YA literature, but the bleakness, alienation, magical realism, and hint of insanity (which I think make it gothic enough) still evoke a strong emotional response in me 15 years after I first read it.

    P.S. Pleasepleaseplease don't pick Twilight!

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  50. P.P.S. Oops, forgot my email!

    musemiu at gmail

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  51. The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole.


    bgcchs(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  52. How about The Strangely Beautiful Tate of Miss Percy Parker by Leanna Renee Hieber? New, and So deliciously gothic it makes my teeth hurt. And the Author wears a mourning hat at pretty much every event she does.

    Stella

    blueflamesabove@yahoo.com

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  53. Damn it. this is what happens when I type quick.

    It should be The Strangely Beautiful Tale of Percy Parker.

    Not tate... whoa that could be pornographic I think.

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  54. The Devil On Horseback by Victoria Holt.
    erma6323@sbcglobal.net

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  55. The Body Snatcher by Robert Louis Stevenson.

    dhesh at webmail dot co dot za

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  56. Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen. More of a gothic parody, but still enjoyable.

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  57. I like Dragonwyck by Anya Seton!

    annemarie562000(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  58. As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner.
    rinei.martiani@gmail.com

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  59. Sanctuary by William Faulkner.
    I like William's novel
    rinei.martiani@gmail.com

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  60. The Black Opal by Victoria Holt.
    fatmeatloaf1 at gmail dot com

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  61. The raven and two goths by e. poe ;)

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  62. The Fall of the House of Usher, Edgar Allan Poe

    skyxsky27(at)gmail.com

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  63. Gothic Charm School: An Essential Guide for Goths and Those Who Love Them by Jillian Venters
    digicat {AT} sbcglobal {DOT} net

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  64. How about "Villette" by Charlotte Bronte. It's my favorite of her novels.
    thevanandthecart (at) gmail (d0t) com

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  65. There are certainly a lot to choose from, starting a couple of centuries ago. My suggestion is Ammie Come Home by Barbara Michaels.

    cgclynsg0 at gmail dot com

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  66. # Wieland (1798) by Charles Brockden Brown

    susansmoaks at gmail dot com

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  67. Bram Stoker's "Dracula" would be great since everyone is familiar with the story..well maybe not the original novel, but at least the character! tylerpants(at)gmail.com

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  68. Interview with the Vampire by Anne Rice

    lilyk@mail2world.com

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  69. Since no one's said it yet, and it holds a very special place in my heart - Flowers in the Attic, VC Andrews. I just had to throw it in there!

    demonrapunzelATyahooDOTcom

    Thanks for the contest!

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  70. Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allen Poe would be my first pick :)

    ktgonyea at gmail.com

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  71. "The Tell-Tale Heart" by Edgar Allan Poe is a great gothic short story! peanut[at]nyc.rr.com

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  72. I would suggest A Drop of Scarlet by Jemiah Jefferson. garrettsambo@aol.com

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  73. I've always liked Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier.

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  74. Daiane Negretti
    daia171@hotmail.com

    Castle of Otranto from Horace Walpole

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